Super 8, Regular 8 and 8 mm Film Digitization, Berlin

Astounding, how much information a Super8 frame can hold, even though it only measures a tiny 4.22 x 5.63mm. 

Of course, a digitization cannot actually make films sharper, but our 1080p Full-HD digitization gets the most out of them. During capture and later, by making upscaling unnecessary.

They also contain enough information, to print stills or to change the 4:3 film aspect ratio to 16:9. Five times as much resolution also makes it feasible, to combine your 8mm films with modern media in a single project.
Undoubtedly, future users of your family archive will appreciate your foresight.

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HD Video comes in 16:9 aspect ratio, which means that films, which generally were taken in 4:3, sport black bars left and right.

Here a few examples as mpeg4 files, which will also play on iPhone and iPad.  (Apple Quicktime required)
Below the same films as Flash-Movies. We are currently testing a few Flash-Players, so, please excuse any display problems.

A circa 40sec film (S8 brought up to speed by means of frame-duplication) once in letterbox format and once zoomed-in to 16:9

 

A charming S8 film, which - while not really sharp - illustrates the Full-HD advantage especially in the water reflections.

Regular8 film, without speed adjustment, with adjustment and then zoomed to 16:9

 

 

 

If you have DSL und 5 minutes to spare, have a look at an Adobe "Streaming Web-DVD".

This Regular 8 film from 1937, with lots of sensitivity and cinematographic talent, provides a highly intimate and surprising glimpse at pre-War Germany.
Flash-Player will open in a new window and may need to preload a little.





 

 

 

 

 

 

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